Overview

The University of Texas at San Antonio’s College of Engineering offers twelve graduate degree programs and is one of the nation’s leading producers of Hispanic engineers.

The college’s four departments – Biomedical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering – have prepared thousands of graduates for successful careers in the public sector, private sector and higher education.

Over the past ten years, the College of Engineering has experienced unprecedented growth as both our undergraduate and graduate student enrollment expands. Additionally, we have had a tenfold increase in extramural research funding. College of Engineering faculty are national and international leaders in communications security, biomedical engineering, aging aircraft/structures, manufacturing, water resources and transportation.

In addition to its own dedicated Engineering Building, the College of Engineering operates out of UTSA’s $84 million, 227,000-square-foot Biotechnology, Sciences and Engineering Building (BSE), which opened in 2006. The BSE features high-tech classrooms, state-of-the-art laboratories and modern computing networks. The second phase of this project—the $90 million, 150,000-square-foot Applied Engineering and Technology Building (AET)—opened in the fall of 2009. And now, the College will be breaking ground on another new building in 2017.

If you have more questions about Graduate Programs, please fill out this FORM so that we may answer any and all inquiries.

Admissions

If you have any questions pertaining to admissions, please contact us or call The Graduate School’s reception area at (210) 458-4330 or (210) 458-4331.

  • Admit Types   You may select from one of three admission options when applying online. Please refer to the information below for complete details:

Master's Degrees

M.S. In Advanced Manufacturing & Enterprise Engineering

The Master of Science program in Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Engineering (M.S. in AMEE) is designed to offer an opportunity to individuals for continued study toward positions of leadership in industry and academia and for continuing technical education in a more specialized area.

Graduates of this program will have the fundamental knowledge and understanding of the operational complexity of enterprises, manufacturing and business process improvement/optimization, and integrated product/process/system design.

In addition, graduates will have the cognitive skills to critically evaluate the potential benefits of alternative manufacturing strategies; to use virtual/simulated platforms to facilitate and improve business processes; and to analyze enterprise systems as systems of interacting units, components, and subsystems.

The program offers a thesis option and a non-thesis option.

Program Information

Why pursue a Masters in Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Engineering? As lean thinking, enterprise process re-engineering, and digital manufacturing are becoming more prevalent in the work place, engineering students need to be prepared to design and analyze the enterprise as a holistic system of technology, decision-making processes, and cultural components.

Advanced Manufacturing, as the core component of enterprise systems, encompasses effective and efficient integration and synthesis of automation technologies, human resources, and decision-making models that facilitate design, planning, scheduling, and control of production of goods and provision of services. Enterprise Engineering is defined as the body of knowledge, principles, and practices having to do with the analysis, design, implementation and operation of an enterprise.

The MS in AMEE is truly an interdisciplinary program founded on the strong collaboration of the Departments of Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Information Systems and Technology Management, Management Science and Statistics, and Computer Science and the Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Lean Systems (CAMLS). Graduate students are exposed to research problems through interaction with the industry members of CAMLS and its state-of-the-art laboratory facilities.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree is 30 for the thesis option and 33 for the non-thesis option.

Courses offered for the graduate programs of these collaborating departments complement the MS in AMEE program in the form of elective courses. Through core and a variety of elective courses, students can customize their program of study according to their specific needs, professional development related goals, and career objectives in consultation with the Graduate Advisor of Record (GAR), as well as their thesis advisor and thesis committee.

Please visit the Graduate Catalog for the most up-to-date information on this degree plan/requirements.

Admissions and Deadlines

Program Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet University-wide graduate admission requirements as outlined in Admission, of the UTSA Graduate Catalog. Applicants must also comply with general University regulations as outlined in General Academic Regulations, and Master’s Degree Regulations, of the UTSA Graduate Catalog.

Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the program, the Graduate Advisor of Record (GAR), in consultation with the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Program Committee and the Department Chair, will evaluate each student’s transcript and determine any course deficiencies on a case-by-case basis. Students admitted with course deficiencies will be required to take additional courses within their Program of Study to make up the deficiencies. Courses taken to make up deficiencies may not count toward the graduate degree.

Applicants who have insufficient preparation for the program, or who lack certain supporting documentation, may be admitted on a conditional basis.

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S. In Advanced Materials Engineering

The goal of the Master of Science in Advanced Materials Engineering program is to train graduate students with state-of-the-art technical knowledge and skill sets necessary for independent critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making to address multidisciplinary problems in materials engineering. The degree program also provides students with opportunities in taking multidisciplinary courses from within the College of Engineering and from other colleges at UTSA in order to enhance students’ leadership, problem solving, and/or entrepreneurship skills.

Graduates of the MS MatE will be general practitioners and specialists, thus the degree program will provide the necessary balance between the fundamental and technical aspects of the field. All students will take core courses to achieve a common platform of understanding and knowledge covering topics in three interlinked areas: (a) Structure-function relationships in materials, which determine behavior at the macro-, micro-, nano-, molecular- and atomic-levels; (b) Synthesis, characterization and measurement of materials (ceramics, composites, metals, polymers, multifunctional and metamaterials) especially those with novel properties to address current and future technological challenges; and (c) Design and applications of materials that address critical issues facing society including energy, sustainability and health care.

Each student will choose one of the concentrations according to materials classifications and applications tailored to his or her specialities:

  • Concentration I- Multifunctional Electronic, Dielectric, Photonic and Magnetic Materials
  • Concentration II- Multifunctional Biomedical Materials

Interwoven in the two concentrations will be concepts of computational modeling that develops new materials with novel properties and responses for targeted applications.

Program Information

Why pursue a Masters in Advanced Materials Engineering?

  • Interdisciplinary curriculum (taking courses from Materials Engineering, Management of Technology, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Bio-Engineering, and other science and engineering disciplines across departmental boundaries).
  • State-of-the-art technical knowledge and skill training
  • Internship and Fellowship opportunities
  • Pathways to Doctoral Programs and leadership job opportunities in Materials Science and Engineering

Graduates will have advanced knowledge and capability to solve problems related to the synthesis, characterization, design, and application of materials. Graduates choosing biomedical material concentration will also be a job-ready workforce for the continued growth of biotechnology.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree is 30 for the thesis option and 33 for the non-thesis option.

Courses offered for the graduate programs of these collaborating departments complement the MS in MatE program in the form of elective courses. Through core and a variety of elective courses, students can customize their program of study according to their specific needs, professional development related goals, and career objectives in consultation with the Graduate Advisor of Record (GAR), as well as their thesis advisor and thesis committee.

Admissions and Deadlines

Program Admission Requirements

  • Admission pre-requisites: Bachelor’s degree in materials science, physics, chemistry, or any discipline in engineering. Minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in the last 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate studies.
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Transcripts: Official transcripts from ALL colleges and universities attended
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Required
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two letters of recommendation
  • Statement of Purpose: A statement of research experience, interests and goals.
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (for International Applicants): 550 paper/79 internet
  • Minimum IELTS Score (for International Applicants): 6.5

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S. In Biomedical Engineering

Why pursue Masters in Biomedical Engineering?

  • Interfacing Engineering/Science with Medicine
  • Multidisciplinary
  • Cutting-edge technology with translational research

A Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Biomedical Engineering (BME) at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is offered through a joint graduate program with The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA).

A matrix of academic tracks is offered based on segments of biomedical engineering and/or areas of clinical emphasis. Specifically, the program has emphases in the following areas: biomaterials, biomechanics, and bioimaging. The biological areas covered are orthopedics/dental tissues, cardiovascular systems and neurological systems

Program Information

Research Taking Place in the Biomedical Engineering Program

Multidisciplinary research is mostly translational, with applications in medicine. Current students in the program perform research on biomaterials, biomechanics, or bioimaging, with applications in orthopedics, cardiovascular, or neurology.

Examples of current research areas of focus are tissue engineering and drug deliveries for bone and cardiovascular applications, Brain MRI, bone mechanics, cardiovascular mechanics, dental materials, biosensors, cellular engineering, and tissue-implant interfaces.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

All Biomedical Engineering courses are offered during the day.

Career Options Available for a Biomedical Engineering Graduate

PhD students have the option to continue their training as a post-doc for a year or two after completion of the program before seeking a faculty position in an academic institution. Other students may apply for positions with the biomedical industries or the federal agencies (FDA, etc) after graduation.

Graduates from our MS program have the option to apply to PhD programs in BME or to the medical school. Like the PhD students, the MS students may also apply for positions with the biomedical industries or the federal agencies (FDA, etc) after graduation.

Admissions requirements and pre-requisites:

For more specific requirements, please visit the Online Graduate Catalog.

  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Yes
  • Letters of Recommendation: 1 letter required, 3 preferred
  • Statement of Purpose: Yes
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550 Paper/79 Internet
  • Other Degree Requirements: Statement of Purpose should include the applicant’s research experience, interests, and goals.

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S. In Civil Engineering

The Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering is designed to provide civil engineering professionals with the opportunity to prepare for careers concerned with the critical problems of a multifaceted society.

Civil engineering education and research activities focus on projects that are typically large and costly, with potentially profound environmental, social, and financial impacts.

Why pursue a Masters in Civl Engineering?

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering (MSCE) and a new Master of Civil Engineering degree (MCE). The MSCE is a research oriented thesis program, while the MCE is a course only technical training program.

The objective of the graduate degree program is to provide advanced training in the four civil engineering specialty areas:

  • Environmental
  • Geotechnical/Transportation
  • Structural and Water Resources

Small class sizes ensure personal attention from the highly qualified faculty. The department has state-of-the-art laboratories for each major technical area.

These labs—housed in the Engineering Building (EB); Biotechnology, Sciences and Engineering (BSE) building; and Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) building—include:

  • Geo-materials (AASHTO Accredited)
  • Geotechnical
  • Environmental
  • Structures
  • Hydraulics
  • PC/CAD
  • Research Taking Place in the Civil Environmental Program

The most recent graduate thesis’ work includes:

  • Investigation of Juniperus Woodland Replacement Dynamics
  • Phytoremediation of Lead Contaminated Soils
  • Effectiveness of Al- and Fe-based Drinking Water Treatment Residuals in Remediating Soil Arsenic: Mechanisms and Implication
  • Watershed Streamflow Estimation Utilizing Remote Sensing Time-Series Proxies of Landscape Moisture State and Radar Precipitation.

Funding Opportunities

Research Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships are available on a competitive basis to full time students carrying out research. Typical amounts are $22.5k and $25.5k per year for MSCE and PhD students.

Funding agencies include:

Course Scheduling and Offerings

A listing of our available courses per semester are listed on the Civil Engineering webpage.

Career Options Available for a Civil Engineering Graduate

Our graduates are in high demand in a multitude of private and government agencies, such as engineering consulting firms, infrastructure design/construction companies, environmental health companies, as well as various state, city and municipal government organizations.

M.S. in Civil Engineering Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Admissions requirements and pre-requisites

  • Bachelor’s degree with 18 credit hours in field of study or in another appropriate field of study.
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Optional
  • Letters of Recommendation: Optional
  • Statement of Purpose: Yes
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550paper/79 internet
  • Other Degree Requirements: Statement of Purpose should include research interests and career goals.

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S. In Computer Engineering

The Master of Science degree in Computer Engineering is designed to offer the students the opportunity to prepare for leadership roles in careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.

Students enrolled in the M.S. Degree program in Computer Engineering have two different options to obtain their degree:

  • Thesis Option
  • Non-thesis option

A thesis option is offered for students who want the opportunity to obtain expertise in research and who may be interested in pursuing the doctoral degree in computer engineering or electrical engineering.

A non-thesis option is offered for students who want a practical industrial applications-oriented degree.

Program Information

Why pursue a Masters in Computer Engineering?

The Ph.D. program in Electrical Engineering M.S. program in Electrical Engineering and M.S. program in Computer Engineering offer opportunities in both advanced course work and research project to prepare students for leadership roles in engineering careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.

Our graduate programs stress both theoretical and practical aspects of Electrical and Computer Engineering by combining the teaching and research expertise of the University community with the resources of other San Antonio research institutions.

The Graduate Faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering are very active in conducting cutting-edge research projects which provide both research experiences and financial supports for our graduate students.

Research taking place in the M.S. Computer Engineering program

The research in our graduate programs at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering mainly focuses on five concentrations:

Communications

Fiber optic communications, fiber optic sensors, coding and error correction, control of communication networks, positioning and navigation algorithms, GPS, signal processing for communications, digital communications systems, wireless mobile communications, information theory, and signal detection and estimation.

Computer and Digital Systesm

Parallel and distributed computing, routing in computer networks, network intrusion detection, computer architecture, ASICs, RISC processors, microprocessor based systems, VLSI design and testing, CAD tools, HDL modeling and FPGA implementation, computer graphics hardware and software parallelism, visualization techniques, information science, optimization and forecasting, digital systems, multimedia and network processors, low power VLSI systems, and reconfigurable computing.

Signal and Image Processing

Signal and image processing, visual communication, and quantum information processing and communication, signals and systems, tomographic imaging, processing biomedical images FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), theory of fast unitary transforms, robust linear and nonlinear filters, morphological image processing, statistical signal processing, Bayesian methods, sampling-based approaches.

Systems and Control

Intelligent systems, neural networks and fuzzy systems, adaptive learning, data mining, networking, diagnosis and prognosis, health monitoring, and robotics and automation, Complex Systems, Computational Intelligence, System of Systems Engineering, Mechatronics, Neuro-fuzzy techniques, robotics and intelligent networks/systems, robust and adaptive control, stabilization of nonlinear systems, optimal control, homogeneous systems theory, aerospace systems and power plants.

Microelectronics and Microdevices

This concentration area provides students with balanced training in theory and experimentation in the areas of analog and mixed signal integrated circuit design, microsystems technology (MEMS), RF and Microwave devices. Research emphasis covers such diverse topics as wireless transceivers, data converters, power management, VLSI, micromirror arrays, MEMS microwave devices, Bio-MEMS, photonic crystals, microfluidics, sensor arrays, microchemical reactors, micropropulsion and energy harvesting schemes. Graduates are well qualified to seek employment in semiconductor manufacturing, aerospace, telecommunications, petrochemical industry, food and chemical processing, microelectronics research and development, health care and other industries requiring analog circuitry, sensing schemes or the application of microdevices.

For more research projects, please refer to the Computer Engineering Faculty Research website.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

Our graduate courses are offered mostly in afternoon and evening. About half of courses are taught in the afternoon (2 p.m. – 5 p.m.) and another half in the evening (5 p.m. – 8:15 p.m.).

Career Options Available for a Computer Engineering Graduate

After graduation, our MS and PhD graduates are employed as engineers or researcher in research firms and industries.

Some of our former doctorate students are working in universities as faculty members.

Admissions and Deadlines

Admissions requirements and pre-requisites

  • Bachelor’s degree with 18 credit hours in field of study or in another appropriate field of study.
  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: No
  • Letters of Recommendation: No
  • Statement of Purpose: No
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550paper/79 internet

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S. In Electrical Engineering

The Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering is designed to offer students the opportunity to prepare for leadership roles in careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.

A thesis option is offered for students who want the opportunity to obtain some expertise in research. A nonthesis option is available for students who want a practical industrial applications-oriented degree.

Program Information

Why pursue a Masters in Electrical Engineering?

The Ph.D. program in Electrical Engineering, M.S. program in Electrical Engineering, and M.S. program in Computer Engineering offer opportunities in both advanced course work and research project to prepare students for leadership roles in engineering careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.

Our graduate programs stress both theoretical and practical aspects of Electrical and Computer Engineering by combining the teaching and research expertise of the University community with the resources of other San Antonio research institutions.

The Graduate Faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering are very active in conducting cutting-edge research projects which provide both research experiences and financial supports for our graduate students.

Research Taking Place in the M.S. Electrical Engineering Program

The research in our graduate programs at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering mainly focuses on five concentrations:

Communications

Fiber optic communications, fiber optic sensors, coding and error correction, control of communication networks, positioning and navigation algorithms, GPS, signal processing for communications, digital communications systems, wireless mobile communications, information theory, and signal detection and estimation.

Computer and Digital Systesm

Parallel and distributed computing, routing in computer networks, network intrusion detection, computer architecture, ASICs, RISC processors, microprocessor based systems, VLSI design and testing, CAD tools, HDL modeling and FPGA implementation, computer graphics hardware and software parallelism, visualization techniques, information science, optimization and forecasting, digital systems, multimedia and network processors, low power VLSI systems, and reconfigurable computing.

Signal and Image Processing

Signal and image processing, visual communication, and quantum information processing and communication, signals and systems, tomographic imaging, processing biomedical images FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), theory of fast unitary transforms, robust linear and nonlinear filters, morphological image processing, statistical signal processing, Bayesian methods, sampling-based approaches.

Systems and Control

Intelligent systems, neural networks and fuzzy systems, adaptive learning, data mining, networking, diagnosis and prognosis, health monitoring, and robotics and automation, Complex Systems, Computational Intelligence, System of Systems Engineering, Mechatronics, Neuro-fuzzy techniques, robotics and intelligent networks/systems, robust and adaptive control, stabilization of nonlinear systems, optimal control, homogeneous systems theory, aerospace systems and power plants.

Microelectronics and Microdevices

This concentration area provides students with balanced training in theory and experimentation in the areas of analog and mixed signal integrated circuit design, microsystems technology (MEMS), RF and Microwave devices. Research emphasis covers such diverse topics as wireless transceivers, data converters, power management, VLSI, micromirror arrays, MEMS microwave devices, Bio-MEMS, photonic crystals, microfluidics, sensor arrays, microchemical reactors, micropropulsion and energy harvesting schemes. Graduates are well qualified to seek employment in semiconductor manufacturing, aerospace, telecommunications, petrochemical industry, food and chemical processing, microelectronics research and development, health care and other industries requiring analog circuitry, sensing schemes or the application of microdevices.

For more research projects, please refer to the Computer Engineering Faculty Research website.

Funding Opportunities

Research stipends and scholarships will be posted to the College of Engineering Scholarships page as they become available.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

Our graduate courses are offered mostly in afternoon and evening. About half of courses are taught in the afternoon (2 p.m. – 5 p.m.) and another half in the evening (5 p.m. – 8:15 p.m.).

Career Options Available for an Electrical Engineering Graduate

After graduation, our MS and PhD graduates are employed as engineers or researcher in research firms and industries.

Some of our former doctorate students are working in universities as faculty members.

Admissions and Deadlines

Admissions requirements and pre-requisites

  • Bachelor’s degree with 18 credit hours in field of study or in another appropriate field of study.
  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: No
  • Letters of Recommendation: No
  • Statement of Purpose: No
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550 paper/79 internet

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

M.S in Mechanical Engineering

The Master of Science program in Mechanical Engineering is designed to offer students the opportunity to prepare for leadership roles in careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.
A thesis option is offered for research-oriented students.
A non-thesis option is available for students who prefer a practice-oriented degree in engineering.

Program Information

Why pursue a Masters in Mechanical Engineering?

  • Nationally and internationally recognized faculty working on leading research projects funded by federal agencies, as well as industry, in state-of-the-art laboratory facilities.
  • Hands-on experiences and employment opportunities due to strong links with industry.
  • A diverse environment with faculty, staff, and students.
  • Research Taking Place in the M.S. in Mechanical Engineering Program

Concentration Areas:

  • Biomechanics and Bioengineering
  • Manufacturing and Enterprise Engineering
  • Mechanical Systems and Design
  • Mechanics and Materials
  • Thermal and Fluid Systems
  • Expertise
  • Advanced Robotics and Manipulators
  • Bone and Vascular Biomechanics
  • Biometric Triage Monitoring
  • Computational Structural Reliability
  • Computational Bioengineering
  • Dynamic Systems and Controls
  • Explosive Device Detection and Blast Injury Effects
  • Flexible Automation and RFID Applications
  • Lean Manufacturing Assessment and Measurement
  • Multiphase Flow
  • Network-Centric Manufacturing
  • Renewable Energy

Funding Opportunities

Course Scheduling and Offerings

  • Professional engineers in R&D, Enterprise Process Engineering, Manufacturing, etc.
  • Research personnel of national labs, NASA, Department of Defense.
  • Manufacturing in general.
  • Automobile industry.
  • Aerospace industry.
  • Major Defense Contractors, such as General Dynamics, Lockheed, Boeing.

Admissions and Deadlines

M.S in Mechanical Engineering Admissions requirements and deadlines

  • Bachelor’s degree with 18 credit hours in field of study or in another appropriate field of study.
  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: No
  • Letters of Recommendation: Optional
  • Statement of Purpose: Optional
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550paper/79 internet

 

Doctoral Degrees

Ph.D. In Biomedical Engineering

The objective of the program is to train students in the use of basic biomedical engineering approaches for the investigation of fundamental bioengineering questions associated with the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

The educational goals of this program are founded on the belief that the basic scientific approach is critical to the fundamental understanding of human health and the treatment of disease.

Program Information

Why pursue a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering?

Interfacing Engineering/Science with Medicine
Multidisciplinary
Cutting-edge technology with translational research

Research Taking Place in the Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering Program

Multidisciplinary research is mostly translational, with applications in medicine. Current students in the program perform research on biomaterials, biomechanics, or bioimaging, with applications in orthopedics, cardiovascular, or neurology.

Examples of current research areas of focus are tissue engineering and drug deliveries for bone and cardiovascular applications, Brain MRI, bone mechanics, cardiovascular mechanics, dental materials, biosensors, cellular engineering, and tissue-implant interfaces.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

All Biomedical Engineering courses are offered during the day.

Career Options Available for a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Graduate

Ph.D. students have the option to continue their training as a post-doc for a year or 2 after completion of the program before seeking a faculty position in an academic institution. Other students may apply for positions with the biomedical industries or the federal agencies (FDA, etc) after graduation.

Graduates from our MS program have the option to apply to PhD programs in BME or to the medical school. Like the PhD students, the MS students may also apply for positions with the biomedical industries or the federal agencies (FDA, etc) after graduation.

Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

For more specific requirements, please visit the Online Graduate Catalog.

  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Yes
  • Letters of Recommendation: 3 L/R required
  • Statement of Purpose: Yes
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550 paper/79 internet

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

Ph.D. In Electrical Engineering

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers advanced coursework integrated with research leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Electrical Engineering. The program has emphases in five concentrations: Computer Engineering, Systems and Control, Digital Signal Processing, Communications and Electronic Materials and Devices.

The Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering will be awarded to candidates who have displayed an in-depth understanding of the subject matter and demonstrated the ability to make an original contribution to knowledge in their field of specialty.

Program Information

Why Pursue a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering?

The Ph.D. program in Electrical Engineering, M.S. program in Electrical Engineering and M.S. program in Computer Engineering offer opportunities in both advanced course work and research projects to prepare students for leadership roles in engineering careers with industry, government, or educational institutions.

Our graduate programs stress both theoretical and practical aspects of Electrical and Computer Engineering by combining the teaching and research expertise of the university community with the resources of other San Antonio research institutions.

The graduate faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering are very active in conducting cutting-edge research projects which provide both research experiences and financial supports for our graduate students.

Research Taking Place in the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering Program

The research in our graduate programs at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering mainly focuses on five concentrations:

Communications

Fiber optic communications, fiber optic sensors, coding and error correction, control of communication networks, positioning and navigation algorithms, GPS, signal processing for communications, digital communications systems, wireless mobile communications, information theory, and signal detection and estimation.

Computer and Digital Systesm

Parallel and distributed computing, routing in computer networks, network intrusion detection, computer architecture, ASICs, RISC processors, microprocessor based systems, VLSI design and testing, CAD tools, HDL modeling and FPGA implementation, computer graphics hardware and software parallelism, visualization techniques, information science, optimization and forecasting, digital systems, multimedia and network processors, low power VLSI systems, and reconfigurable computing.

Signal and Image Processing

Signal and image processing, visual communication, and quantum information processing and communication, signals and systems, tomographic imaging, processing biomedical images FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization), theory of fast unitary transforms, robust linear and nonlinear filters, morphological image processing, statistical signal processing, Bayesian methods, sampling-based approaches.

Systems and Control

Intelligent systems, neural networks and fuzzy systems, adaptive learning, data mining, networking, diagnosis and prognosis, health monitoring, and robotics and automation, Complex Systems, Computational Intelligence, System of Systems Engineering, Mechatronics, Neuro-fuzzy techniques, robotics and intelligent networks/systems, robust and adaptive control, stabilization of nonlinear systems, optimal control, homogeneous systems theory, aerospace systems and power plants.

Microelectronics and Microdevices

This concentration area provides students with balanced training in theory and experimentation in the areas of analog and mixed signal integrated circuit design, microsystems technology (MEMS), RF and Microwave devices. Research emphasis covers such diverse topics as wireless transceivers, data converters, power management, VLSI, micromirror arrays, MEMS microwave devices, Bio-MEMS, photonic crystals, microfluidics, sensor arrays, microchemical reactors, micropropulsion and energy harvesting schemes. Graduates are well qualified to seek employment in semiconductor manufacturing, aerospace, telecommunications, petrochemical industry, food and chemical processing, microelectronics research and development, health care and other industries requiring analog circuitry, sensing schemes or the application of microdevices.

For more research projects, please refer to the Computer Engineering Faculty Research website.

Funding Opportunities

Research stipends and scholarships will be posted to the College of Engineering Scholarships page as they become available.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

Our graduate courses are offered mostly in afternoon and evening. About half of the courses are taught in the afternoon (2 p.m. – 5 p.m.) and another half in the evening (5 p.m. – 8:15 p.m.).

Career Options Available for an Electrical Engineering Graduate

After graduation, our MS and PhD graduates are employed as engineers or researcher in research firms and industries.

Some of our former doctorate students are working in universities as faculty members.

Admissions and Deadlines

Admissions requirements and pre-requisites

For more specific requirements, please visit the Online Graduate Catalog.

  • Specific Degree Requirements: N/A
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Yes
  • Letters of Recommendation: 3 L/R required
  • Statement of Purpose: Yes
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550 paper/79 internet

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

Ph.D. In Environmental Science & Engineering

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Environmental Science and Engineering is designed to provide students enrolled in the program with advanced training in research in many aspects of the environmental sciences and environmental engineering.

The main emphasis of the new doctoral degree will be on natural resources, especially water resources, land and air resources.

Dissertation research could focus on hydrology, water quality, water pollution control, waste disposal, environmental quality, remediation, ecology, conservation, restoration, contaminants, air pollution control, global change, atmospheric chemistry, environmental geochemistry, environmental microbiology, microbial geochemistry, volcanic hazards, tectonics, seismic hazards, or other anthropogenic changes.

Overall, students will be educated in the fundamental areas of Environmental Science and Engineering.

Program Information

Financial Support

All doctoral applicants applying for full-time status may compete for up to $20,000 stipend support per academic year. Other funding opportunities, such as teaching assistant and research assistant positions are available. Scholarships are available from a variety of sources, while graduate students may be fully supported through research and teaching assistantships.

Facilities

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has state-of-the-art laboratories for each major technical area. Housed in the Engineering Building and Biotechnology, Sciences and Engineering Building, these laboratories are used for hands-on research training of graduate students. In addition, computer labs are available for demonstrating state-of-the art application software similar to the ones used by practicing engineers.

Research Taking Place in the Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Engineering Program

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Environmental Science and Engineering program draws on the resources of both the College of Sciences and the College of Engineering. Faculty share responsibilities in providing courses, research supervision, and facilities for this program.

Areas of research emphasis include water resources, environmental quality, environmental remediation, pollution control, conservation ecology, spatial analysis, remote sensing, and natural hazards.

The Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Engineering is awarded to candidates who display an in-depth understanding of the subject matter and demonstrate the ability to make an original contribution to knowledge in their field of specialty.

Funding Opportunities

New funding opportunities will be announced on the Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. program webpage.

Course Scheduling and Offerings

Most, if not all classes are offered in the evening.

Career Options Available for an Environmental Science and Engineering Graduate

Our graduates are in high demand in a multitude of private and government agencies, such as engineering consulting firms, infrastructure design/construction companies, environmental health companies, as well as various state, city and municipal government organizations.

Admission Requirements and Deadlines

Admissions Requirements and pre-requisites:

For more specific requirements, please visit the Online Graduate Catalog

.

  • Specific Degree Requirements: Yes
  • Graduate Studies Application: Yes
  • Department Application: No
  • Test Scores: General GRE required
  • Resume or CV: Yes
  • Letters of Recommendation: 3 L/R required
  • Statement of Purpose: Yes
  • Minimum TOEFL Score: 550 paper/79 internet

Please visit the Graduate Admissions Deadline page for a list of application deadlines.

Ph.D. In Mechanical Engineering

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers advanced coursework integrated with research leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mechanical Engineering.

The program has four concentrations:

  • Thermal and Fluid Systems
  • Design and Manufacturing Systems
  • Mechanics and Materials
  • Biomechanics/Bioengineering

The Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering will be awarded to candidates who have displayed an in-depth understanding of the subject matter and demonstrated the ability to make an original contribution to knowledge in their field of specialty.

The regulations for this degree comply with the general University regulations (refer to Chapter 2: General Academic Regulations, and Chapter 5: Doctoral Degree Regulations).

Admissions Requirements

All graduate students must meet the university admission requirements as outlined in the graduate catalog. The minimum requirements for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering degree program are as follows:

Students whose native language is not English must achieve a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Normally, a student must hold a Master’s degree in mechanical engineering or in a related field with a GPA of 3.0 or better before being granted admission to the Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering degree program at UTSA. Such applicants may apply a maximum of 30 semester credit hours of previously earned graduate credit toward their doctoral degree. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours credit may be awarded for a master’s thesis (such as ME 6983). Each student’s transcript will be evaluated by the Graduate Programs Committee and credit will be designated on a course-by-course basis to satisfy the formal coursework requirements of the degree.

Outstanding students, who do not hold a Master’s degree, may enter the Doctor of Philosophy program on provisional status directly upon receiving a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering or a closely related field, with the special approval of the Graduate Programs Committee. Such applicants must have a GPA of 3.5 or better in the last 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate coursework in mechanical engineering or a closely related field. A student with provisional status must meet the course requirements of the Master’s degree program and all requirements of the Doctoral Program within two years of full-time equivalent studies at the Ph.D. program.

The Graduate Programs Committee will evaluate each applicant, approve the necessary requirements, and recommend corrective actions on a case-by-case basis.

In general undergraduate courses, general education courses, and prerequisites for graduate courses cannot be counted toward the total. The entire program of study must be recommended by the student’s dissertation advisor by the end of 9 credit hours of coursework, approved by the graduate programs committee, and must be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School for final approval.

The courses taken by students are intended to focus and support the individual’s mastery of his or her particular area of specialization.

Qualifying Examination

All students seeking a doctoral degree at UTSA must be admitted to “candidacy” in order to become eligible to continue their research that leads to a PhD degree. The requirement for admission to candidacy is passing a qualifying examination. The qualifying examination of the PhD/ME program comprises two parts:

  • A written examination based on coursework
  • An oral examination based on the research interest of the student. After passing the qualifying examinations, the student becomes a PhD candidate.

Written Qualifying Examination:

The written part of the qualifying examination is given in June of each year. Upon approval by their PhD advisor, students wishing to take the examination must submit their request in writing to the Graduate Advisor of Record before March 31. Normally, the written examination is taken by students who have completed the coursework listed under sections A and B of the curriculum in Table 1. Students who fail the written qualifying examination in their first attempt may petition for a second attempt. No more than two attempts are permitted to pass the written examination.

The purpose of the written qualifying examination is to ensure that students pursuing a doctoral degree in Mechanical Engineering have the essential depth and breadth of knowledge basis. The Department of Mechanical Engineering administers the written qualifying examination in the following four areas with the supporting courses:

COMMON AREATECHNICAL AREAS

Students are required to take the common area as well as a major area and a minor area from the three technical areas (a, b, c) of Mechanical Engineering.

The written qualifying examination includes three parts:

  • Part 1-Common Area (this is a mandatory area)
  • Part 2-Major Area (selected by student)
  • Part 3-Minor Area (selected by student).

The three parts of the written exam are given on three different days. The examinations are administered once a year in June. Each part (Common Core, Thermal and Fluid Systems, Design and Manufacturing Systems, Mechanics and Materials) consists of six (6) questions to be answered in three (3) hours. The examinations are typically in the form of closed books and notes. If needed, the faculty member preparing the questions provides a formula sheet.

Oral Qualifying Examination:

For a student who has passed the written qualifying examination in June, the oral part of the qualifying examination should be given in December of the year or in January of the next year. An oral qualifying examination committee, which includes at least three graduate faculty members, should be assembled by his/her PhD Advisor as the chair of the committee. The timing of the second examination is determined by the oral qualifying examination committee. The student prepares a 20-minute presentation on a topic of research interest, which highlights the research objective, motivation (need for research), literature survey, methodology, expected results, deliverables, and a timeline to complete the research.

The objective of the oral qualifying examination is twofold:

  1. To evaluate the student’s skills for understanding the literature and summarizing the “state of the art” in the area of research interest;
  2. To form the dissertation committee of the student based on the interest of the faculty attending the oral examination.

The oral qualifying examinations are broadly announced and all faculty members are invited to attend, ask questions, and provide feedback. After the oral qualifying examination, the oral qualifying examination committee determines if the student has passed the examination in consultation with Graduate Studies Committee. Students who fail the oral qualifying examination in their first attempt are allowed to make a second attempt. No more than two attempts are permitted to pass the oral examination.

Dissertation Committee

A PhD candidate needs to assemble his/her dissertation committee in consultation with his/her PhD Advisor. The dissertation committee members are typically selected by the student in consultation with the PhD advisor and approved by the Graduate Advisor of Record and the Department Chair. This process should start as early as the time when the student has selected a PhD Advisor. The dissertation committee must be finalized no later than one month of passing the oral qualifying examination.

A dissertation committee includes the PhD advisor as the chair of the committee and a minimum of four members. Of the four members, at least two must be Mechanical Engineering graduate faculty members and one must be outside the department or UTSA, whose suitability will be subject to approval of the Graduate School. Part-time faculty may serve as members of the dissertation committee, but may not serve as PhD advisors.

PhD Dissertation Proposal

After admission to candidacy, the student should first consider research topics for his/her dissertation, and then write a dissertation proposal based on preliminary results. Normally, the dissertation proposal is presented to the dissertation committee of the student within one year after admission to candidacy. During this time, students take ME 7983-6 Doctoral Research (Table 1, Section E). The dissertation proposal consists of quantifiable and verifiable objectives, literature survey, methodology, preliminary work, deliverables, and expected contribution.

A written dissertation proposal should be submitted to the student’s dissertation committee at least two weeks before the oral presentation. The dissertation proposal should:

  • explain the basic idea of the dissertation topic,
  • describe why that topic is original, challenging, and important,
  • present an overview of the related work in the field,
  • state what kind of results are expected, and present preliminary results, if any, and
  • make a plausible argument that the study can be completed within a proposed time line.

The student should write the dissertation proposal as soon as he/she can address the issues described above. The dissertation proposal should be typically single spaced and 25-30 pages long. A public presentation of the student’s dissertation proposal will be arranged and followed by a closed-door questioning by the dissertation committee.

The oral presentation is typically a 40-minute talk, followed by a question-and-answer session. Following the public presentation, the dissertation committee will conduct a closed-door oral examination based on the proposal and on relevant background from the student’s Program of Study. Only the dissertation committee members may attend the closed-door session. After the examination, the student will be asked to leave, and the dissertation committee will discuss the student’s performance in the dissertation proposal presentation. The dissertation committee may recommend changes before approving the dissertation proposal. No more than two attempts are permitted for the student to get his/her dissertation proposal approved.

Final Oral Dissertation Defense

After the approval of the dissertation proposal, the next steps are writing the dissertation and passing the final oral defense. During this time, students take ME 7993-6 Doctoral Dissertation (Table 1, Section E). The final oral defense is administered and evaluated by the student’s PhD dissertation committee and covers the general field of the dissertation. The final oral defense consists of a public presentation of the dissertation, followed by a closed session with the members of the dissertation committee. It is expected that the material of the dissertation will be of archival quality and will be published in journals. The dissertation must be approved by a unanimous decision of the Dissertation Committee.

Degree Requirements and Program of Study

The degree requires 90 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree or 60 credits beyond the master’s degree, passing of Qualifying Exam, Dissertation Prospectus, and Dissertation Defense and acceptance of the Ph.D. dissertation.

Curriculum (60 credit hours A through E)

Common Core Courses (6 credit hours)

  • EGR 6013 Analytical Techniques in Engineering 3 credit hours
  • ME 6113 Experimental Techniques in Engineering 3 credit hours
  • ME 6973 Special Problems: Advanced Mathematics in Engineering 3 credit hours
  • Technical Core Courses (6 credit hours)

Students are required to take at least two courses from the following list corresponding to their Major Area of study.

Thermal and Fluid Systems:

  • ME 5243 Advanced Thermodynamics 3 credit hours
  • ME 5613 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 credit hours

Design and Manufacturing Systems:

  • ME 5113 Advanced System Dynamics and Controls 3 credit hours
  • ME 5503 Lean Manufacturing and Lean Enterprises 3 credit hours

Mechanics and Materials:

  • ME 5413 Advanced Solid Mechanics 3 credit hours
  • ME 5713 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3 credit hours

Elective Courses (9 credit hours)

Students are required to take at least three elective courses in consultation with their Ph.D. advisors.

  • Seminar (3 credit hours taken for three semesters)
  • ME 7991 Research Seminar 1 credit hour
  • Doctoral Research and Dissertation (18 credit hours each)
  • ME 7993-6 Doctoral Dissertation 3-6 credit hours
  • ME 7983-6 Doctoral Research 3-6 credit hours

Please see the Graduate Catalog for the most up-to-date information on doctoral admissions.

Have an inquiry about the college?

We appreciate your interest in the College of Engineering at UTSA and extend our warmest welcome to you from the college.

TOP